The Grinding Shed: I God We Trust - The Grinding Shed

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I God We Trust Its a miracle drug ... literally

#1 User is offline   Green Mamba Icon

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 08:58 AM

I went to church with my wife this weekend. I enjoy going to church even though I don't believe in God. I like listening to the sermons, trying to distinguish truth from fiction.

While sitting there listening to how Jesus forgives sins as if they never happened, I suddenly realised that this kind of faith in a higher power is very therapeutic. By shifting all your troubles (guilt, fears, emotional pain, etc) onto something or someone other than yourself, your life become a lot less stressful. Even the rituals assist to focus the mind away from your problems and the doctrines spell everything out clearly so that you don't have to burden yourself with the morality of any given situation. It's quite amazing really ... no wonder so many people cling to it regardless of all the obvious bullshit that goes with it.

If the lie is better than the harsh reality, then people will defend it with their lives no?

EDIT: Idiot - IN God we trust [A - this fancy new board doesn't allow me to change the title afterwards].

This post has been edited by Green Mamba: 10 February 2004 - 09:11 AM

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#2 User is offline   Anton Icon

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 03:29 PM

I've always thought that the majority of people who are religious are so because they need some kind of theological comfort blanket. They can't handle certain aspects of life so they look towards a greater power in order to explain things. Granted it won't be that way for everyone but I would say there's a majority that fit into this category if only subconciously

For me though, I see it as somehting similar to the blinkers a horse wears. Religion can stop you from seeing the danger in the outside world and allow you to concentrate fully on what's ahead. The only problem with that is you never learn as much as you could, how can you stop being scared of the outside world if you're afraid to keep looking at it?

So yeah, i guess religion is like an anti-depressant of some sort. Feel free to take it and you could get better and find an inner peace, the only problem is there's a good chance you're circumventing the problem as opposed to eradicating it
What was here before made me cringe and cry.
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#3 User is offline   Dragonfly Icon

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Posted 12 February 2004 - 03:35 AM

As someone whose always been interested in ritual magic, I have to say that the ritual itself can be a very powerful force to use and experience. Most magicians will tell you that if you feel a ritual helped you, then it worked - it doesn't matter what it was for, whether for money or healing or peace.

One ritual is good to help you to experience this for yourself is the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram; because its probably one of the shortest rituals out there. I'm sure google will produce lots of results for anyone remotely interested in it.


I think that's how Satanism can still hold together, without having anything to pray to. The rituals give you a sense of power, so you feel able to cope with all your stress and troubles. Same with ritualistic magic. Its the reason why Wicca is one of the biggest growing religions today (that's what I read, anyhow).


Its funny how the role of God is fulfilled in Buddhism and generally in the East by Karma. God will take care of everything if you're good (and even if you're not, f'ckit, pray and make up with your personal saviour), and Karma will give your good deeds back to you. The only difference is you can't fight a war for Karma or in the name of Karma, because its a law of physics and can't hear you, and wouldn't care if it did.
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#4 User is offline   Dragonfly Icon

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Posted 15 February 2004 - 05:03 PM

Spooky, on Feb 15 2004, 05:52 AM, said:

Regardless of whether or not this works, this shit was hardly hewn into the living rock of Stonehenge, you know?

I take it, from your words, you've never been to Stonehenge, Illinois?


No well, quite rightly, there's as much history in wicca as there is wild instinct in my pocket watch. What I'm saying is that you can have The Latter Day Saints of Barnie if you concoct a good story and some great rituals around it.
...and prime time children's tv.
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#5 User is offline   Green Mamba Icon

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 05:09 AM

Ok, that's nice now about that dragon in my engine block?

PS: I know I started this topic and maybe I should have something more substantial to add ... except right now I don't ... so about that dragon...
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#6 User is offline   blondeatheart55555 Icon

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Post icon  Posted 18 February 2004 - 02:25 AM

Its not a "theological comfort blanket". Its a way to deal with life. Those who believe in a religion show moral virtues, faith, and values, and EVERYBODY can benefit from those things. I dont expect church to cahnge everyone but the certain methodic way people go to church and worship helps even out our lives. Church can build a community. A loner can become one with the rest. they can band together and help those in need. I think that churches are very benefitial, and if you can spend the hour,(my church only lasts and hour) every sunday and more hours when you choose during the week to participate, everyone would benefit greatly :D

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I'm not sure I want popular opinion on my side -- I've noticed those with the most opinions often have the fewest facts.
    Bethania McKenstry

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This post has been edited by blondeatheart55555: 18 February 2004 - 02:31 AM

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#7 User is offline   Green Mamba Icon

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Posted 18 February 2004 - 04:44 AM

So you are saying those who dont belong to some religion do not show moral virtues, have no faith (in anything) and have no values? Also, a cumunity is made up of people who have something in common, be it the place where they live, a common goal, or a common faith. The church is not a prerequisite for a community and neither if faith in God. It can also be argued that the church drives a wedge between people who believe in God and people who don't ... "either you are with me, or you are against me".
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#8 User is offline   too_many_people Icon

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Posted 18 February 2004 - 04:52 AM

To bolster Mamba's point, I submit the very Atheist perspective of secular humanism. The value system in which we attempt to do good by our fellow man with no expectation of a reward after we die, we just do it to be good people.

Does that make secular humanism better than most religions? I mean, they're expecting rewards for being good and for praying and whatnot. Secular Humanists are just being good. :ph34r:

This post has been edited by too_many_people: 18 February 2004 - 04:52 AM

And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
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#9 Guest_Spooky_*

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Posted 18 February 2004 - 07:49 AM

too_many_people, on Feb 17 2004, 09:38 PM, said:

[SIZE=1]Does that make secular humanism better than most religions?

I call foul play; pretending there's any overriding difference between a philosophy and a religion? Philosophies are just unorganized.

True seperation from "religion" comes only through the ignorance of higher concepts, and the only perfect "Atheists" are animals.
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#10 User is offline   too_many_people Icon

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Posted 18 February 2004 - 04:08 PM

Man... It was a joke. I realize that a secular philosophy, regardless of its completeness (which isn't a word, but hey), can't really replace a religion. There's that whole faith thing to consider.
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
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#11 Guest_Spooky_*

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Posted 18 February 2004 - 08:14 PM

That's hardly what I'm saying. Every person has faith in their philosophy/religion/baby eating cult because every one of them makes metaphysical assumptions. I mean, it only takes one instance of a rock not falling to the ground when dropped to shatter science. It just hasn't happened yet.

Man...
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#12 User is offline   too_many_people Icon

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Posted 18 February 2004 - 10:56 PM

That was more of an exasperated, I-hate-it-when-my-jokes-don't-pan-out kind of "Man..." than a condescending kind.
Anyway...
I guess I misunderstood. Now that I see what you're saying, I don't care. :D
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
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#13 User is offline   Aqua Icon

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Posted 19 February 2004 - 12:27 AM

(While happy facts are being passed around...)

Fact:
Non-religious people are 5 times more likely to report being unhappy than religious people.*

*Gibson, John E. (1977) How to Size Up People, Carillon Books, Minnesota, p. 143.

and also:

Fact: Someone who never prays is more likely to say that they would pick up a crying child and comfort it, as opposed to someone who prays every day.*

*Bernhard Grom, Religionpsychologie, Muchen, Gottingen: Kosel/Vandenhoack Ruprecht, 1992.

And while I'm at it:
Q. Who works harder -- the average atheist, or the average religious person?

A. The average atheist

*Liana Giorgi & Catherin Marsh, "The Protestant Work Ethic as Cultural Phenomenon", European Journal of Social Psychology, 20, 1990.
o.o

This post has been edited by Aqua: 19 February 2004 - 12:28 AM

Ars longa vita brevis est.
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#14 User is offline   blondeatheart55555 Icon

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Posted 19 February 2004 - 02:28 AM

Mamba,
what im saying is representative. a church, a religion is a community. they are one people. and because they believe in one thing, people benefit. unfourtunately, humans are quite disputable creatures and refuse to all agree on the same beliefs
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#15 User is offline   Green Mamba Icon

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Posted 19 February 2004 - 04:57 AM

blondeatheart55555, on Feb 19 2004, 05:14 AM, said:

humans are quite disputable creatures and refuse to all agree on the same beliefs

I got that. What I'm saying is that a church (specifically) is not a prerequisite for a community ... and neither is religion.

If we all believed the same thing then there'd be a lot less bullshit (or at least we'd all agree on what we believe is bullshit and what isn't)
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