The Grinding Shed: I God We Trust - The Grinding Shed

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I God We Trust Its a miracle drug ... literally

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Posted 21 February 2004 - 03:51 AM

Where we're going wrong with is equating the sense of community with agreeing with the same belief.

More often than not, religion only tends to heighten our differences rather than our unity, because of that very tribalistic streak in humans that make us more comfortable and friendly with "us" than "others". To rephrase, community can be very alive and kicking within your little/big circle, but the separation between groups becomes much larger. If we invite our beliefs to be what holds us together, we're looking forward to a very very fractured world.

Why can't we feel the same sense of community outside the limiting boundaries of thought and belief, which are so prone to difference, obsession and exaggeration anyway? Isn't it more dangerous to have a community around "this god" (who happens to be bi-polar between wrathful and loving, and have severe xenophobic traits in the passages the good of us tend to overlook as outdated but too many people tend to lovingly embrace.) than "this [book/garden/coffee/music/race] club", when absolutes are mistaken for polarities on a daily basis? One hardly has a holy war because Anne Rice said so in her latest novel, does one? But an unnamed author of an ancient book is quite different.

I'm explaining something quite simple so maddeningly confusingly.

Religion seems to separate people more than they bring together, because it is absolute and a perfect truth. And if your perfect truth says that eating pork will make anyone slimy, you won't look your friend with the same eye when he eats his roastpork sandwich will you?
I am all for religion as a personal spirituality, which can be shared and enhanced by friends and family and community, but when you base your community on something like that, it can make things very one sided.

Isn't the fact that humans "refuse to all agree on the same beliefs" an effective reason against a society founded on a unifying belief?
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