The Grinding Shed: Cd's & Cellphones - The Grinding Shed

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Cd's & Cellphones Who came first?

#1 User is offline   Green Mamba Icon

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 07:33 AM

Does anybody know when the CD and the Cellphone was invented (which years respectively)?

The answer surprised me at first ... and then made perfect sense, because that is still the way the world works.
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#2 User is offline   Green Mamba Icon

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 12:49 PM

I am specifically talking Cellular and CD technology.

Either way, you're a little closer to the truth than Spooks ... which I will reveal tomorrow in typical Ripley's style if nobody gets it right by then.
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#3 User is offline   VanGogh Icon

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 02:29 PM

*Fresh from Google University, VanGogh makes his cut & paste entrance*

The basic concept of cellular phones began in 1947, when researchers looked at crude mobile (car) phones and realized that by using small cells (range of service area) with frequency reuse they could increase the traffic capacity of mobile phones substantially. However at that time, the technology to do so was nonexistent.

In 1947, AT&T proposed that the FCC allocate a large number of radio-spectrum frequencies so that widespread mobile telephone service would become feasible and AT&T would have a incentive to research the new technology. We can partially blame the FCC for the gap between the initial concept of cellular service and its availability to the public. The FCC decided to limit the amount of frequencies available in 1947, the limits made only twenty-three phone conversations possible simultaneously in the same service area - not a market incentive for research.

The FCC reconsidered its position in 1968, stating "if the technology to build a better mobile service works, we will increase the frequencies allocation, freeing the airwaves for more mobile phones." AT&T and Bell Labs proposed a cellular system to the FCC of many small, low-powered, broadcast towers, each covering a 'cell' a few miles in radius and collectively covering a larger area. Each tower would use only a few of the total frequencies allocated to the system. As the phones traveled across the area, calls would be passed from tower to tower.

In September of 1975, Dr. Martin Cooper, working for Motorola, gets a patent for a radio telephone system. Cooper made the first call on a portable cell phone in April 1973. He made the call to his rival, Joel Engel, Bell Labs head of research. Bell Laboratories introduced the idea of cellular communications in 1947 with the police car technology. However, Motorola was the first to incorporate the technology into portable device that was designed for outside of a automobile use. Cooper and his co-inventors are listed above.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1969 - Sony introduces it's 13-bit PCM digital recorder at a 47.25 kHz (47,250 time per second) sampling rate. The digital recording is sent to a 2" video tape. Klass Compaan, a Dutch physicist comes up with the idea for the Compact Disc.

1970 - At Philips, Compaan and Pete Kramer complete a glass disc prototype and determine that a laser will be needed to read the information.

1971 - Microprocessor produced by Intel
Digital Delay line used by BBC's studios (first digital audio device).

1972 - Compaan and Kramer produce color prototype of this new compact disc technology

1973 - BBC and other broadcast companies start installing digital recorders for master recordings.

1977 - Mitsubishi, Hitachi & Sony show digital audio disc prototypes at the Tokyo Audio Fair.
JVC Develops Digital Audio Process

1978 - Philips releases the video disc player
Sony sells the PCM-1600 and PCM-1 (digital audio processors)
"Digital Audio Disc Convention" Held in Tokyo, Japan with 35 different manufacturers. Philips proposes that a worldwide standard be set.
Polygram (division of Philips) determined that polycarbonate would be the best material for the CD. Decision made for data on a CD to start on the inside and spiral towards the outer edge. Disc diameter originally set at 115mm. Type of laser selected for CD Players.

1979 - Prototype CD System demonstrated in Europe and Japan.
Sony agrees to join in collaboration. Sony & Philips compromise on the standard sampling rate of a CD -- 44.1 kHz (44,100 samples per second) Philips accepts Sony's proposal for 16-bit audio. Reed-Solomon code adopted after Sony's suggestion. Maximum playing time decided to be slighty more that 74 minutes. Disc diameter changed to 120mm to allow for 74 minutes of 16-bit stereo sound with a sample rate of 44.1 kHz

1980 - Compact Disc standard proposed by Philips & Sony.

1981 - Matsushita accepts Compact Disc Standard
Digital Audio Disc Committee also accepts Compact Disc Standard.
Sharp achieves production of semiconductor laser.
Philips & Sony collaboration ends.

1982 - Sony & Philips both have product ready to go.
Compact Disc Technology is introduced to Europe and Japan in the fall.


And finally... as an added useless knowledge bonus:

Q. Who is the one man generally credited with inventing the CD?

A. James Russell
And the horse you rode in on...
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#4 User is offline   Lilith Icon

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 03:51 PM

No, not really. ;) In the information age, information is, well, rather available for those who bother to look at all.

If VG hadn't done it, I would have. I am not a huge fan of the pompous "... und I vill reveal zee anzwer in three, two, one..." tactic myself.
You know, I think humanity really owes Satan an apology--we've really only heard one side of the story. (Unknown)
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#5 User is offline   Assassin13 Icon

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 05:17 PM

Just wait until Green Mamba comes back to find that VG dashed all his hopes and dreams with one swoop of the google universe.
Welcome to AKpCEP.... where everyone is odd, the world is your Oyster and the bar is open on days that end in 'y', between the hours of now and never.
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#6 User is offline   Lilith Icon

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 06:17 PM

Unforgiven, on Feb 11 2004, 11:53 AM, said:

It's not pompus, the point is to get a few guesses in before the revelation.

That only works if people have to guess and the information is not readily available. Since it can be easily aquired on the net, what is the point of the "guesses before a revelation"? No one needs to guess anything, other than possibly which dates the originator of the thread used to mark the invention--the original concept, the prototype, or beginning of mass production.
You know, I think humanity really owes Satan an apology--we've really only heard one side of the story. (Unknown)
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#7 User is offline   VanGogh Icon

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 06:54 PM

Assassin13, on Feb 11 2004, 02:03 PM, said:

Just wait until Green Mamba comes back to find that VG dashed all his hopes and dreams with one swoop of the google universe.

ph33r my googlish ways... :ph34r:
And the horse you rode in on...
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#8 User is offline   Green Mamba Icon

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 07:48 PM

Great stuff van Gogh ... and no it doesn't matter where you got the info (even if its much more than what I asked).
The point to the post was really to highlight how technology is held back before it's introduced to the general public. CD's since 1970 and we only saw it come to life in 1982 (South Africa only got it in the late 1980's).

What really get's to me is who are the bastards that decide when we can have access to what?
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#9 User is offline   Anton Icon

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Posted 12 February 2004 - 12:09 AM

Glad I think you're forgetting the "We can milk more money out of current technology" reason.
What was here before made me cringe and cry.
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